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Jakob Kullberg

cello
1976
Jakob Kullberg © Camilla Winther

Jakob Kullberg, the esteemed cellist, is renowned for his unparalleled talent and fearless interpretations, pushing the boundaries of the classical cellist’s traditional role in today’s international music scene. Born in Denmark in 1976, Kullberg has garnered acclaim for his mesmerising performances of contemporary cello concertos and captivating solo performances. The 2021 Nordic Council Music Prize nominee, Jakob Kullberg has made his mark through collaborations with orchestras such as the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, BBC Philharmonic, Bergen Philharmonic Orchestra, Sinfonia Varsovia, Wrocław Philharmonic, Tallinn Chamber Orchestra, and the major symphony orchestras in Denmark, Sweden, Norway, and Finland. His artistry has graced renowned festivals including the Aldeburgh Festival, Bergen International Festival, Huddersfield Festival and Warsaw Autumn Festival.

Kullberg’s illustrious career includes winning numerous prizes at international solo and chamber music competitions, and boasting an impressive discography, including two P2 Prisen awards as well as a shortlisting for a Gramophone Award. Notably, he has forged a close collaboration with esteemed composer Per Nørgård, whose entire cello-output of the last 20 years has been composed specifically for Kullberg. His interpretations and collaborations with composers such as Kaija Saariaho, Bent Sørensen and Niels Rønsholdt have also earned him recognition.

Kullberg is a sought-after pedagogue and has been a Professor of Cello at the Royal College of Music in London since 2016. Additionally, he is an Associate of the Royal Academy of Music, London, and has been the artistic director of the Open Strings Cello Masterclass since its establishment in 2004. Sharing his expertise and passion for music education, he conducts masterclasses at renowned institutions across Europe, US and China.

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