Dansk Dansk    US Dollars (change)
Dacapo Home
Dacapo - The National Music Anthology of Denmark

Poul Ruders

Selma Jezková (Dancer in the Dark)


Guido Paevatalu, baritone
Hanne Fischer, mezzo-soprano
Gert Henning-Jensen, tenor
Ulla Kudsk Jensen, mezzo-soprano
Ylva Kihlberg, soprano
Palle Knudsen, baritone
Carl Philip Levin
Royal Danish Orchestra
Michael Schønwandt, conductor

Poul Ruders, composer

About:
Poul Ruders' opera Selma Jezková (2010) is based on Lars von Trier's film Dancer in the Dark and follows the heart-wrenching story of Selma, a poor factory worker with failing eyesight who sacrifices her life to ensure that her son receives an eye operation. The opera is a dark and compelling story of fate; a highly evocative and epic performance yet also intensely distilled with a duration of just 70 minutes. In this DVD production of the Copenhagen premiere performance, the forces of the Royal Danish Opera are directed by Kasper Holten and framed by Christian Lemmerz' grand Gothic set design. Conductor Michael Schønwandt commands the podium and the demanding title role is sung by Ylva Kihlberg, to whom Poul Ruders has dedicated the role.

Buy DVD (NTSC)

  $32.50

Prices shown in US Dollars

Text auf Deutsch

Selma's Songs by Anders Beyer

"There are enough operas in this world, so there has to be a good reason to compose any more, and the reason doesn't absolutely have to be political, but there's every reason to have a socially critical angle. The most important thing, though, is the EMOTIONS! I repeat: the EMOTIONS! That's where music is far and away superior to the other arts. There has to be a strong human story behind the realistic scenario, as there is in both Margaret Atwood's novel The Handmaid's Tale and in Lars von Trier's film Dancer in the Dark. That's why I chose exactly those two stories." 

Poul Ruders wants to seduce; he wants the audience in the hollow of his hand. Dramatic, evocative music has always interested him, and the opposite poles in his own music stretch from Heaven to Hell. Nothing less. In his breakthrough work Thus Saw Saint John (1984) for orchestra the literary source is the Apocalypse (the Revelation of St. John), and the First Symphony from 1989 similarly has the subtitle Himmelhoch jauchzend - zum Tode betrübt (Exulting to the Heavens - Grieving unto Death), a title taken from Klärchen's Song in Goethe's Egmont. In The Bells for soprano and chamber ensemble it is Edgar Allan Poe's screams and horror that form the sounding board of the music. In many cases you can read the fundamental character of the music out of the title: Regime, Abysm, Dramaphonia, Requiem, Towards the Precipice, Nightshade.

Taking the drama in the symphonic works into the opera format was probably no great leap. However, an early attempt with the chamber opera Tycho from 1987 wasn't a success. Only the mature Ruders, with full mastery of the complex opera format, was able to achieve world fame with The Handmaid's Tale (2000), followed up with Kafka's Trial from 2005.

With The Handmaid's Tale and Kafka's Trial Ruders wanted to pull material down from many different instrumental, vocal and choral shelves, and deploy the whole expensive apparatus. Selma Jezková is less monolithic, much more mobile, and not least much more manageable to produce. In Selma Jezková the big orchestral apparatus has been toned down to an orchestral ensemble of 33 musicians. Instead of flute and oboe Ruders uses saxophones, and a synthesizer interpolates a corny musical-like atmosphere among the acoustic instruments. Ruders sees signs in the times that you have to be ready to think along new lines if you want to get over the footlights:

"The question is whether the party's over for the big, expensive full-length operas (newly written, that is), with a giant orchestra, chorus, rows of soloists and Uncle Tom Cobley and all. With the new opera the fundamental ideas for me can easily be realized with a smaller ensemble. It's important for me to depict the naked, emotional ‘assault' - I'd almost call it - that forms a kind of primal operatic material. After all, Von Trier's film is half a musical (and no, I don't use Björk's music, although I do like it, which may surprise some people), but I go my own way and write a wall-to-wall opera based on this fantastic story. And Henrik Engelbrecht has himself written the texts for some very simple, deeply touching Selma's Songs, which pop up as small oases of peace, longing and tenderness amidst the brutal development of the work," Ruders says.

 

From film to opera

"When my wife Annette and I staggered out of the Dagmar cinema after seeing the film, tear-dimmed and surrounded by other sobbing and sniffling cinema-goers, I said: "There's only one thing wrong with that film, and that is that it isn't an opera by me!""

So says Ruders about his first encounter with Lars von Trier's film - which he has had no intention of transforming into opera on a one-to-one scale. Forget all about Björk's music, forget all about the film's interweaving of several stories. Poul Ruders focuses on the woman Selma Jezková's story - that is, the actual tragedy of this Selma who sacrifices herself to get the money for her son's eye operation.

"When I had the initial talks with Henrik Engelbrecht, whom I asked to write the libretto based on von Trier's original film script, it was clear to both of us that we would only concentrate on the main story itself, the tragedy. That's why the opera is short, about half as long as the film." Ruders continues:

"Selma is ill and poor (and that isn't the worst starting point for the heroine of an opera!), and when - after being sacked - she shoots the local sheriff Bill Houston in desperation after discovering that he's trying to steal the hard-earned wages from the factory she's saved, money she needs for Gene's operation, the fire has certainly been stoked up. Since she refuses at the trial to tell the whole truth behind the crime of passion again Houston, she is sentenced to death. Selma is hanged - an indirect suicide. The ultimate sacrifice, for love of her child and his - that is, Gene's - future happiness, is the only thing that means anything to the unfortunate woman. But aren't we faced with a moral dilemma? Maybe Gene would in fact have preferred to have his mother alive, even if he would slowly go blind. Maybe Selma's decision is more egoistic than self-sacrificing?"

 

The art of communicating

 

Selma Jezková is Ruders' third commission from the Royal Danish Theatre. As in the composer's previous operas the musical-theatrical fuel comes from human fates in a realistic plot. We can identify with the destinies and the drama that unfold out on the stage.

This identification has remained solid since the early instrumental works by Ruders. ‘Abstract dramas', Ruders himself has called his instrumental music. The composer was born in 1949. The date is not without significance: he belongs to a generation that has not had the same dialogue with musical modernism as some of his older colleagues, for example Per Nørgård, Ib Nørholm and Pelle Gudmundsen-Holmgreen. Poul Ruders and Bo Holten are from the generation that composed without belonging to the central European avant-garde, and it is these composers who, with a fundamental aesthetic intention of communicating with the audience, are now filling the opera houses.

Ruders' music from the early years constantly asked the question "What can we use the tradition for?". The works related to the legacy of musical history. Poul Ruders listened his way down through the historical layers and let the past echo through his contemporary musical art. In Ruders' music the references to the old music were gradually eliminated, but a basic mood persists as something immutable in the soundscape: the wish to recreate some of the lost past through a modern idiom. With Ruders you sense the enjoyment of the way the music sounds, and at the same time a longing for the beauty of the lost. It is this sense of the unfulfilled that helps to create the tension in his music: the sense of the frailty of the dream-image and the feeling of an absence when it is all over.

But how does the man do it, quite specifically? Working with instruments and working with voices are very different things. What goes on in Ruders' mind when he has to get the important emotions down on paper and out over the footlights to the audience?

"Singers or ‘voices' are after all a much more fluid concept than an ‘ordinary' instrument. An oboe plays from there to there, sounds a particular way in a particular register, is good for one thing but less capable of something else, and then it doesn't matter who's playing and whether we're in Ulan Bator or the Danish provinces. In opera, as we know, the ‘story' has to be sung, and since it takes a longer time to sing the sentence "Go and shut the door" than it takes to say it, the composer must constantly - both before and during the composition work - sit on the shoulder of the librettist like a bat and make sure the text doesn't grow beyond all reason. Well. I didn't have to be after Henrik Engelbrecht all that much. Instinctively - and in a very short time - he rewrote von Trier's original, in itself very slim, film script with a firm hand."

"I'll leave it to others to judge whether I can write for voices, but even though everyone, even those who won't admit it, knows that no one can understand a word - literally - when something is sung, with the exception maybe of a slow, unaccompanied version of Itsy Bitsy Spider, the composer has to make an effort and stick to a few basic rules. The higher you sing, the harder it is to understand anything; that's why the male voices are the ones you can understand easiest, since they're pitched closer to the natural level of speech. And then you have to make sure - the second someone's mouth opens up on the stage - that you thin out the instrumentation, not only in terms of volume, but also of depth. If you use the whole ‘engine room' - that is, the double-basses, cellos, bassoons and low brass - a kind of ‘ash cloud of harmonics' arises that interferes with the unimpeded flight of the singing to the higher reaches."

Poul Ruders composed the opera Selma Jezková after a tear-jerking, soul-shaking experience of the film Dancer in the Dark. Like the film director, the composer wants to move the audience and set the scene for the big emotions. He concludes with a greeting to von Trier:

"I haven't had any contact at all myself with von Trier, but I hope he'll come to the premiere. He probably will - after all, he must be curious to see what I've done with his story??"

Anders Beyer is the director of the ensemble Athelas Sinfonietta Copenhagen and of the Copenhagen Opera Festival

 

THEY SAY IT IS THE LAST SONG. THEY DON'T KNOW US ...

by Nila Parly

The interior is cold and damp. The church is abandoned - burnt out in more than one sense. The soot from the fire that must once have raged furiously in the church interior has hardened on its seeping way down the wall. Here all hope is gone, all life stiffened in large black stains of soot. Here God is dead. But now something happens. With great difficulty the little boy standing by the open coffin in the middle of the church lifts the heavy body of his mother into sitting position. Selma is dead - and then again she is not. She only managed to sing her second-last song in Lars von Trier's film before she was sentenced to death and hanged. Now she steps out of her coffin and sing it all over again - in a more powerful and far more tragic voice. For her son needs to hear her retell the story, and the rest of us are not finished with it either.

One thing is the debate - long-since-over for Danes - on the abolition of capital punishment; quite another matter is the debate on the elimination of the death urge. And this is where the ending of Selma Jezková raises a number of moral issues; for, deep down, isn't it an unacknowledged death urge that Selma suffers from? And in that case how far is it in fact from altruism to egoism when it comes to her indirect suicide? Is it at all in order that she chooses to be hanged for the sake of her son? Doesn't she in fact saddle him with such an unbearable feeling of complicity in her death that it will overshadow the joy of the sightedness that her sacrifice ensures him?

For us opera-goers it's one of the fundamental features of the opera genre that is challenged here. We are used - not least from Wagner's operas - to self-sacrificing female redeemer figures whose selflessness gives them heroine status. But the fact is that none of these operatic women themselves choose death; it is the creator of the work (the male composer) who has chosen that they will act this way; and it is he who has chosen to accompany the women's last sighs with such movingly beautiful and sensually satisfying music that we catch ourselves enjoying their death, even though the tears are at the same time coursing down our cheeks.

PouI Ruders, who is well known for his feminist opera The Handmaid's Tale, doesn't fall for the temptation to accompany Selma's death with a lush romantic orchestra. We don't get the slightest hint of musical hope that her sacrifice wasn't in vain. After Selma's hanging there's a moment of chilly silence, then the music slowly dies away in scattered, dark aftershocks that only increase the sense of the growing power of the silence.

In Lars von Trier's version of the story there was little trace of hope in the soundscape either. Here too the music fell silent after Selma's death. And anyway, where would the music have come from? After all, the director (Trier) had just hanged the composer (Björk). After the tragic hanging, the camera moved slowly up from Selma's dangling body in the grimly theatre-like execution chamber towards the platform above, where the empathetic woman prison officer was the only person left. She stood immobile with bowed head, deeply touched by the human sacrifice in which she had just participated. The camera continued up. Above the execution chamber there was nothing more - just a black space. The film ended when the whole screen had been filled out with this coal-black darkness.

Lars von Trier's upward pan after Selma's death is almost identical to the upward pan that followed the death of Bess in Breaking the Waves - but without the triumphant bells in the sky. The end of Selma Jezková thus emerges as an atheistic antithesis to the Catholic thesis of Breaking the Waves. Dialectical thinking - that is, setting up a thesis that you then confront with its opposite, the antithesis etc. - is a well tried philosophical principle that often, if you dare use it artistically, widens the human horizon.

But dialectics are for the philosophically minded. You need both the power to think with extreme abstraction and the courage to provoke people who automatically assume that art is a direct expression of the artist's personal views. Lars von Trier has both this power and this courage, and he is quite conscious of his method: "Much of my technique is setting up a thesis of some kind I don't agree with. I don't think bells suddenly start ringing in the sky because Bess does this or that; I don't believe in that, and I don't agree with that." It's unlikely that Trier believes either in the antithesis: the ascetic Selma's right to the ultimate escape from reality into death. That isn't his own belief, but a late romantic idea he is trying out on his audience. As he himself says, "I'm trying to defend something I don't believe in. That's a good exercise when you have a humanist outlook".

It's also a good exercise for us viewers. For although on the intellectual plane we may distance ourselves from Selma's actions in the film, we still understand her - emotionally. We just can't help it. She is the primal force of the whole work, everything is about her, and sooner or later we inevitably identify so much with her that we experience the world from her innocent, art-loving mental space. And here the dream-like musical scenes are of crucial importance. For she doesn't just talk about her dreams, we experience them with her.

And that's how it is too in Ruders' opera. From time to time we abandon its hard-to-grasp almost atonal reality to follow Selma into the unassuming tonal musical universe where everything becomes radiantly beautiful and life feels safe and good. And we resist when we hear the orchestra, insisting on realism, forcing its way into the dreams to call Selma back to reality. In these passages Ruders' music has the impact of an irritating alarm clock we can't switch off. But in the opera - unlike the film - there is another figure to identify with: Selma's son. He isn't, as in Trier's film, a strange, surly introverted boy who rarely appears. No, here he is on the stage from start to finish, reaching out for his mother in the attempt to understand her emotionally. In this way we feel Selma both from the outside and the inside, and the music helps us with those feelings too.

It is of course precisely here that we have the most striking difference from Trier's film: the music plays and the singers sing all the time in the opera - also outside the ‘musical' numbers. The hyper-realistic documentary style in which the film presented the plot is thus - already because of the genre shift to opera - impossible to repeat. What does that mean for our perception of Selma?

In the film, Selma was played by the pop singer Björk. And as several reviewers pointed out, she didn't play Selma, she was Selma. This was of course related to the fact that she isn't an actress; but it was also because Björk is so famous as a pop idol that this image inevitably came to colour our perception of her as Selma. That the interpolated musical numbers were also composed and sung by herself only increased the feeling that the artiste Björk was the dreamer Selma.

In the opera it's Ylva Kilberg who plays the absolutely pivotal role of Selma. She has trained as a singer and actress, and is what we call a dramatic soprano, which means she has a singing voice that - even in the opera context - is unusually powerful and technically well-grounded, and which can deftly drown out the 33-member orchestra ensconced in the theatre pit. She can effortlessly belt out the high B at the most dramatic points in the plot; but like any other opera singer she also risks being indisposed or unfocused on an evening and breaking down on the high notes, bungling the stage business, falling over a bench or the like.

In other words, Ylva has a background that means she is better able than Björk to play the role of Selma. But since we are dealing with a genre that is experienced live, we can't rule out the possibility that we may see her the odd time as who she really is, the singer Ylva; you can't just shout "Cut!" in the opera.

And isn't that exactly the attraction of the opera genre? The presence, the unpredictability? You never quite know what awaits you. On two different days the same production may seem quite different. It depends, too, on the audience's personal past and momentary mood. In short, after the premiere neither librettist, composer nor stage director any longer has control of the work; and if the main character is a truly ambivalent personality, as Selma is, on Monday evening we might experience her as a convincing mythical heroine, prepared to accept the consequences of her mistakes, while the next Thursday she may seem more like a modern narcissist obsessed by the role of victim she has staged herself in.

That's opera when it's best. You're never done with it. "They say it is the last song. They don't know us, you see. You know it's only the last song if we choose to let it be."

Nila Parly is a PhD in musicology

 

SELMA JEZKOVÁ - DEATH THROES IN FLASHBACK

by Esben Tange

The main character in Selma Jezková is in a way Selma's 12-year-old son Gene. True, the role is a silent one. The only exception is an outburst of panic - "Mother, Mother!" - in the final scene of the opera, when Gene sees the doomed Selma standing with the noose around her neck.

Gene is on stage throughout the production, and even before Poul Ruders has made two death-trombones play the first notes of the opera, we see Gene standing front stage as the only active participant in what appears to be Selma's funeral. And when the opera is over, we are back at this starting point. Selma lies in her coffin and the orphaned Gene is left on his own in every sense. The actual plot of the opera is one long flashback sparked off by Gene, who with questioning eyes behind his thick glasses forces his mother to replay the last crucial scenes that led to her death and to Gene being left alone.

Thus the narrative perspective is fundamentally different in Poul Ruders' and Henrik Engelbrecht's opera Selma Jezková from that in Lars von Trier's film Dancer in the Dark, where Selma - played by Björk - is the natural centre of attention, while Gene is only a sour little boy. Yet a number of specific actions are identical, since the point of departure for the story is the same: the Czech Selma Jezková has travelled to the USA to earn money for an expensive operation that can ensure that her son will not lose his sight, as has happened to Selma's mother and grandfather, and as is happening to Selma herself.

After a ceremonious overture where Gene so to speak brings his dead mother back to life, follow the five scenes of the opera, where crucial situations in the last period of Selma Jezková's life are played out. We are in a provincial American town in the 1950s. Selma gives expression to some of her internal imaginings in a number of songs, "Selma's Songs".

 

Scene 1: The Factory

Selma works on an assembly line at a metal goods factory. The work demands concentration, but the weak-sighted Selma still tries to dream herself away from the monotonous work and from the noise in the factory by practicing songs from musicals, trying with great difficulty to read a script as she works.

 

Hear the magic of a crash

Hear the music of the noise

Hear my dreams and aspirations

All in one metallic voice

 

I go back through all dimensions

I am laughing - I can see.

I am feeling like a dancer,

Kathy, come and dance with me.

 

See the splendour and the grandeur,

Feel the fading of the pain.

See the world around us changing,

Feel the dream come true again.

 

I go back through all dimensions,

I am flying fast and free.

I am feeling like a dancer,

I am laughing - I can see.

 

To earn as much money as possible Selma also works on the night shift at the factory, and she is warned by her friend and co-worker Kathy that because of her fatigue she risks harming herself in the dangerous assembly line work. Selma has earlier accidentally destroyed some of the factory's tools, and when things go wrong again she is fired by the foreman Norman, who hands over Selma's last wages in an envelope.

 

Scene 2: The Trailer

We are in the trailer where Selma and Gene live in very primitive conditions. Selma puts her last wages in a box that is stuffed with banknotes. In a brief memory-glimpse from Prague Selma recalls her notions of a wonderful life in America.

Selma rents her trailer from the local sheriff Bill, who comes to visit her. Bill talks about his unhappy marriage to Linda, who is ruining them because she is obsessed with buying new things. Selma responds by telling Bill about the illness that will soon make her blind. She also confides in him that she has lied, and told everyone that she has been earning money to help her old father Oldrich Novy in Czechoslovakia. It is pure invention, for Selma has no father, and Oldrich Novy is the name of a dancer in musicals that Selma saw in her youth. The false father was just an alibi so that Selma could save up all her money for the operation on Gene, who is not aware how serious an eye condition he has.

Bill sees the box with Selma's money, and he asks for a loan, as he hopes to save his failed marriage with new purchases for Linda. But Selma refuses, since all the money has to go to the doctor who is now to operate on Gene. In desperation Bill considers committing suicide with his service revolver; but instead he threatens Selma and tries to take the money box from her; but she fights him with all her strength, and when the pistol goes off the shot hits Bill. Since the shot is not fatal, the broken-down Bill asks Selma to kill him.

 

Scene 3: The Courtroom

At the trial, where Selma is accused of the murder of Bill, the proceedings are started by the District Attorney, who presents Selma in hysterical terms as a greedy, cynical person who killed Bill in cold blood, and when Selma says that Bill asked to be killed, she is ridiculed. Unseen by the public in the courtroom, Selma has made sure that Gene has the money in the box, and when Selma, pressed by the District Attorney, says that Bill wanted to steal her savings, she says that the money has now been sent to her father in Prague, Oldrich Novy. When the District Attorney can now triumphantly present the aging musical star in the witness box, the case is lost, for Oldrich Novy now lives in California and clearly doesn't know Selma.

In a desperate attempt to save his mother's life and enter the action of the opera, Gene tries to give the box of money to the people in the courtroom, but no one notices the 12-year-old boy who has been there as a kind of stowaway throughout the process. Selma Jezková is sentenced to death by hanging.

 

Scene 4: The Death Cell

Alone in the death cell, Selma tries to tell Gene about her life and her ideas of Heaven:

 

My life was not a story,

Like those I used to know.

Where nothing bad could happen,

And happiness would flow.

 

I gave you all I had, dear Gene,

I tried so hard I could.

A castle in the air, perhaps.

I know you understood.

 

My life is nearly over now,

And very soon I'll see,

The things that now are hidden,

The place I long to be.

 

Where all is made of music,

Where all is sounds of joy,

Where dancers spin and turn and twirl,

I'll wait there for my boy.

 

Kathy visits Selma in prison, where she says she has seen through Selma's deceit about the false father, and that Gene wants to visit his mother. But Selma refuses to meet Gene. He must forget about her and look forward to his own life, of which she is no longer a part. Kathy asks wonderingly why Selma wanted to have a child when she knew that he would have the same illness as she did.

 

I knew.

I could not help it.

I wanted it so bad.

 

I wanted to hold a little baby.

Just hold him,

In my arms

 

Kathy urges Selma to tell the truth about the money for Gene's operation, and to spend the money on a lawyer. That could save Selma's life and ensure that Gene still has a mother. But Selma insists that it is more important that Gene is operated for his eye condition. The time runs out for Selma, and the prison guard Brenda tries to give the frightened Selma the courage to go through with the execution for her son's sake.

 

Scene 5: The Gallows Chamber

As she stands on the gallows trap door a scene of panic is played out where Selma can't breathe under the obligatory hood, but with Brenda's help she succeeds in avoiding the hood. At the same time Kathy forces her way into the gallows chamber, where she gives Gene's glasses to Selma - a sign that he has been operated and will not lose his sight. Now Selma gets ready to die.

 

I listen to my heart,

I feel you very near.

Oh Gene I'm not alone,

I know that you are here.

 

You and me.

They tell you that it's over now,

But we will prove them wrong.

Yes, we can see through that my dear.

 

It's only the next to last song.

Playing for you,

Playing for me.

It's only the next to last song.


After the hanging is over everyone leaves the execution chamber. Now Gene can lay his dead mother back in the coffin, take the glasses from her and give her a last kiss.

 

Esben Tange is a musicologist, programme editor for DR P2 and artistic director of the Rued Langgaard Festival.

 

 

Selmas Lieder von Anders Beyer

„Es gibt genug Opern auf dieser Welt, deshalb braucht es einen guten Grund, wenn man noch mehr komponieren will. Dieser Grund muss nicht unbedingt politisch sein, aber ein gesellschaftskritischer Blickwinkel darf schon mitspielen. Das Wichtigste sind jedoch die GEFÜHLE! Ich wiederhole: die GEFÜHLE! Genau das kann die Musik mit unschlagbarer Überlegenheit gegenüber den anderen Kunstarten. Dem realistischen Szenarium muss eine starke menschliche Geschichte zugrunde liegen, wie sie in Margaret Atwoods Roman Der Report der Magd und in Lars von Triers Film Dancer in the Dark zu finden ist. Genau deshalb habe ich mir die beiden Geschichten ausgesucht."

Poul Ruders will verführen; er will das Publikum in der Hand haben. Die dramatische, bildliche Musik hat ihn schon immer fasziniert, und die Pole seiner eigenen reichen vom Himmel bis zur Hölle. Nichts weniger. In seinem Durchbruchswerk Saaledes saae Johannes (So sprach Johannes) (1984) für Orchester holt er sich seine literarische Vorlage aus der Apokalypse (Offenbarung des Johannes), und die 1989 komponierte erste Sinfonie trägt den Untertitel Himmelhoch jauchzend - zum Tode betrübt, den er Clärchens Lied in Goethes Egmont entnommen hat. In The Bells für Sopran und Kammerensemble bilden Edgar Allan Poes Schreie und das Unheimliche den Klangboden der Musik. In vielen Fällen lässt sich der Grundcharakter der Musik aus dem Titel ablesen: Regime, Abysm, Dramaphonia, Requiem, Mod Afgrunden (Zum Abgrund), Natskygge (Nachtschatten).

Der Schritt vom Drama der sinfonischen Werke zum Opernformat war wahrscheinlich kein weiter. Ein früher Versuch mit der 1987 entstandenen Kammeroper Tycho fiel allerdings nicht sehr glücklich aus. Erst der reife Ruders konnte mit seiner vollen Beherrschung des komplexen Opernformats mit seiner Oper Der Report der Magd (2000) Weltruhm erlangen. Danach folgte 2005 Prozess Kafka.

Mit dem Report der Magd und Prozess Kafka wollte Ruders viele Instrumental-, Gesangs- und Chormöglichkeiten und den ganzen teuren Apparat nutzen. Selma Jezková ist weniger monolithisch, etwas mobiler und nicht zuletzt von der Produktion her machbarer. Der große orchestrale Apparat ist auf eine Orchesterbesetzung von 33 Musikern heruntergeschraubt. Statt Flöte und Oboe benutzt Ruders Saxofone, ein Syntheziser bringt angekitschte musicalhafte Stimmung unter die akustischen Instrumente. Ruders sieht in der Zeit Anzeichen dafür, dass man sich darauf einstellen muss, in neuen Bahnen zu denken, wenn man über die Bühnenrampe hinausreichen will.

„Die Frage ist, ob die Zeit der großen, teuren (neu komponierten) abendfüllenden Opern mit Riesenorchester, Chor, unzähligen Solisten und allem Pipapo nicht eigentlich vorbei ist. Mit der neuen Oper lassen sich die Grundideen meinetwegen durchaus mit einer kleineren Besetzung verwirklichen. Mir ist es wichtig, die nackten, emotionalen ‚Überfälle' zu schildern, hätte ich fast gesagt, als eine Art Ur-Opernmaterial. Von Triers Film ist ja ein halbes Musical (und nein, ich verwende Björks Musik nicht, obwohl ich sie mochte, was einige vielleicht verwundern wird), sondern ich gehe meine eigenen Wege und schreibe eine Wand-zu-Wand-Oper über diese phantastische Geschichte. Im Übrigen hat Henrik Engelbrecht selbst den Text zu einigen ganz einfachen, zutiefst anrührenden von Selmas Liedern geschrieben, die als kleine Oasen von Frieden, Sehnsucht und Zärtlichkeit inmitten der brutalen Entwicklung des Werkes auftauchen", erklärt Ruders.

 

Vom Film zur Oper

„Als meine Frau Annette und ich nach dem Film tränenüberströmt und umgeben von anderen schluchzenden und schniefenden Kinogängern aus dem Kino wankten, sagte ich: „... Der Film hat nur einen Fehler, nämlich den, dass er keine Oper von mir ist!"

So Ruders über seine erste Begegnung mit Lars von Triers Film, den er jedoch nicht im Maßstab 1:1 zu einer Oper umgestalten wollte. Nichts mit Björks Musik, nichts mit der filmischen Verflechtung mehrerer Geschichten. Ruders konzentriert sich auf die Geschichte der Selma Jezková, also auf die eigentliche Tragödie der Selma, die sich opfert, um das Geld für die Augenoperation ihres Sohnes zu sichern.

„Als Henrik Engelbrecht, den ich bat, ausgehend von Triers Originalfilmmanuskript das Libretto zu schreiben, und ich unsere einleitenden Gespräche führten, war uns beiden klar, dass wir uns nur auf die Hauptgeschichte, die Tragödie, konzentrieren würden. Deshalb ist die Oper so kurz, etwa halb so lang wie der Film." Ruders fährt fort:

„Selma ist krank und arm (nicht der schlechteste Ausgangspunkt für eine Opernheldin!), und als sie - nachdem sie entlassen worden ist - aus Verzweiflung den Ortspolizisten Bill Houston erschießt, nachdem sie gemerkt hat, dass er ihren sauer zusammengesparten Fabrikslohn, Geld, das sie für Genes Operation braucht, zu stehlen versucht, kann man sich wirklich auf etwas gefasst machen. Als sie sich während des Prozesses weigert, die ganze Wahrheit über den im Affekt begangenen Mord an Houston auszusagen, wird sie zum Tod verurteilt. Selma wird gehängt, ein indirekter Selbstmord. Die höchste Aufopferung, die Liebe zu ihrem Kind und dessen, also Genes, künftiges Glück sind das einzige, was dieser unglücklichen Frau etwas bedeutet. Doch haben wir da nicht ein moralisches Dilemma? Vielleicht hätte Gene es in Wirklichkeit vorgezogen, seine Mutter lebendig zu haben, auch wenn er selbst langsam erblindet wäre. Vielleicht ist Selmas Entschluss eher egoistisch als aufopfernd?"

 

Die Kunst zu kommunizieren

Selma Jezková ist Ruders' dritte Auftragsarbeit für das Königliche Theater in Kopenhagen. Wie schon in den früheren Opern des Komponisten, so liefert auch hier das menschliche Schicksal in einem realistischen Plot den musikalisch-theatralischen Brennstoff. Wir können uns mit den Schicksalen und der Dramatik, die sich auf der Bühne entfalten, identifizieren.

Die Identifikation war bereits in den frühen Instrumentalwerken von Ruders intakt. Ruders hat seine Instrumentalmusik selbst als ‚abstrakte Dramen' bezeichnet. Der Künstler wurde 1949 geboren, wobei die Jahreszahl nicht unwichtig ist: Er gehört einer Generation an, die kein so ausgeprägtes Dialogverhältnis zum musikalischen Modernismus hatte wie einige der älteren Kollegen, z. B. Per Nørgård, Ib Nørholm und Pelle Gudmundsen-Holmgreen. Poul Ruders und Bo Holten gehören zu der Generation, die ohne Zugehörigkeit zur mitteleuropäischen Avantgarde komponierte, und genau diese Komponisten sind es, die ausgehend von einer ästhetischen Grundhaltung, die nach direkter Kommunikation mit dem Publikum verlangt, die Opernhäuser füllen.

Ruders' Musik der frühen Jahre stellte ständig die Frage: „Was können wir mit der Tradition anfangen?" Die Werke nahmen Stellung zur Erbmasse der Musikgeschichte. Ruders hörte sich durch die historischen Schichten zurück und ließ die Vergangenheit in seiner modernen Klangkunst Echowirkungen zeitigen. In Ruders' Musik verwischten sich allmählich die Hinweise auf die alte Musik, doch eine Grundstimmung bleibt unveränderlich im Klangbild zurück, nämlich der Wunsch, durch einen modernen Ausdruck etwas von der verlorenen Vergangenheit neu zu erschaffen. Bei Ruders erlebt man den Genuss des Klingenden, während man sich zugleich nach der Schönheit des Verlorenen sehnt. Genau diese Unerfülltheit trägt dazu bei, seiner Musik Spannung zu verleihen, das Gespür für die Flüchtigkeit des Traumbildes und das Gefühl des Fehlenden, wenn das Ganze vorbei ist.

Doch wie macht der Mann das eigentlich ganz konkret? Mit Instrumenten und mit Stimmen zu arbeiten, das ist etwas ganz Unterschiedliches. Was spielt sich in Ruders' Kopf ab, wenn er die wichtigen Gefühle zu Papier bringen und über die Bühnenrampe hinaus dem Publikum vermitteln will?

„Sänger oder ,Stimmen', das ist ja ein völlig anderer fließender Begriff als ein ,gewöhnliches' Instrument. Eine Oboe spielt von hier nach dort, klingt in bestimmten Registern so und so, ist gut für eine Sache, aber weniger geeignet für etwas anderes, wobei es egal ist, wer sie spielt oder ob wir uns in UIan Bator oder in der dänischen Provinz befinden. In der Oper muss die ,Geschichte' ja bekanntlich gesungen werden, und da es länger dauert, den Satz: „Geh hin und mach die Tür zu" zu singen als ihn auszusprechen, muss sich der Komponist vor und während der Kompositionsarbeit die ganze Zeit über wie eine Fledermaus im Haarschopf des Librettisten verhaken und dafür sorgen, dass der Text nicht über alle Grenzen quillt. Hinter Henrik Engelbrecht musste ich nun allerdings nicht sonderlich hinterher sein. Er schrieb instinktiv und in ganz kurzer Zeit von Triers an sich schon sehr schlankes Originalfilmmanuskript mit sicherer Hand um."

„Ich überlasse es anderen zu entscheiden, ob ich für Stimmen schreiben kann. Jedermann, auch wer es nicht zugeben will, weiß zwar, dass niemand buchstäblich auch nur ein Wort verstehen kann, wenn ,etwas' gesungen wird, ausgenommen vielleicht bei einer langsamen, unbegleiteten Fassung von Hänschen klein, aber trotzdem darf sich der Komponist ja schließlich Mühe geben und sich an ein paar Grundregeln halten. Je weiter oben gesungen wird, umso schwerer versteht man irgendetwas, weshalb die Männerstimmen vom Verständnis her am leichtesten aufzufassen sind, auch weil sie der natürlichen gesprochenen Tonlage am nächsten kommen. Und dann muss man dafür sorgen, dass - in derselben Sekunde, in der jemand oben auf der Bühne den Mund aufmacht - die Instrumentation verdünnt wird, nicht nur im Verhältnis zum Volumen, sondern auch in der Tiefe. Wenn man den ganzen ,Maschinenraum' ausnutzt, das heißt Kontrabässe, Celli, Fagotte und die tiefen Blechbläser, dann entsteht eine Art ,Oberton-Aschenwolke', die den ungehinderten Höhenflug des Gesangs stört."

Ruders komponierte die Oper Selma Jezková nach dem tränenerstickten und seelenerschütternden Erlebnis des Films Dancer in the Dark.

Der Komponist wollte wie der Filmregisseur bewegen und die ganz großen Gefühle auf die Bühne bringen. Er schließt mit einem Gruß an von Trier:

„Ich selbst habe überhaupt keinen Kontakt zu von Trier gehabt, aber ich hoffe doch, dass er zur Premiere kommt. Das tut er sicher, schließlich muss er doch neugierig sein zu sehen, was ich mit seiner Geschichte angefangen habe."

Anders Beyer ist Ensembleleiter von Athelas Sinfonietta Copenhagen und Festivaldirektor des Copenhagen Opera Festival

 

 

SIE SAGEN, ES SEI DAS LETZTE LIED, SIE KENNEN UNS NICHT

von Nila Parly

Der Raum ist kalt und muffig. Die Kirche ist verödet, ausgebrannt in mehr als einer Beziehung. Der Ruß des Feuers, das einst unbezähmbar im Kircheninneren gebrannt haben muss, ist auf seinem leckenden Weg an den Mauern geronnen. Hier ist alle Hoffnung verloren, alles Leben erstarrt in großen schwarzen Rußplacken. Hier ist Gott tot. Doch jetzt geschieht etwas. Der kleine Junge, der an dem offenen Sarg mitten im Raum steht, hebt mit großer Mühe die schwere Leiche seiner Mutter in Sitzstellung. Selma ist tot - und doch wieder nicht. Sie hat doch nur ihr vorletztes Lied gesungen, als sie in Lars von Triers Film zum Tod verurteilt und gehängt wird. Jetzt tritt sie aus ihrem Sarg und singt noch einmal von vorn, mit stärkerer und weitaus tragischerer Stimme. Ihr Sohn muss sie nämlich unbedingt die Geschichte noch einmal erzählen hören, und wir anderen sind auch noch nicht damit fertig.

Eines ist nämlich die - für Dänen und andere Westeuropäer - längst überstandene Diskussion über die Abschaffung der Todesstrafe, etwas anderes dagegen die Diskussion über die Abschaffung des Todestriebes. Genau hier wirft das Ende von Selma Jezková eine Reihe moralischer Fragen auf: Denn leidet Selma nicht ganz zutiefst an unerkanntem Todestrieb? Und wenn ja, wie weit ist es dann vom Altruismus zum Egoismus, wenn es um ihren indirekten Selbstmord geht? Ist es überhaupt in Ordnung, dass sie sich um ihres Sohnes Willen hängen lässt? Zwingt sie ihm in Wirklichkeit nicht ein so unerträgliches Gefühl der Mitschuld an ihrem Tod auf, dass es die Freude an dem Augenlicht, das ihr Todesopfer ihm sichert, überschattet?

Für uns Opernbesucher wird hier eines der grundlegendsten Charakteristika der Operngattung problematisiert. Wir sind, nicht zuletzt aus Wagners Opern, an aufopfernde weibliche Erlöserfiguren gewöhnt, deren Opferwille heroisiert wird. Doch letztlich ist es so, dass alle diese Opernfrauen den Tod nicht selber wählen. Es ist der Schöpfer des Werkes (der Komponist, ein Mann), der entschieden hat, sie so auftreten zu lassen, und er hat beschlossen, den letzten Seufzer der Frauen mit einer so ergreifend schönen und die Sinne befriedigenden Musik zu begleiten, dass wir uns dabei ertappen, ihren Tod zu genießen, obgleich uns gleichzeitig die Tränen über die Wangen laufen.

Der für seine feministische Oper Der Report der Magd bekannte Poul Ruders erliegt der Versuchung, Selmas Tod mit einem schwellenden romantischen Orchester zu begleiten, nicht. Wir bekommen auch nicht die kleinste Andeutung einer musikalischen Hoffnung, ihr Opfer könne vielleicht nicht vergeblich gewesen sein. Nachdem Selma gehängt ist, herrscht einen Augenblick eisige Stille, dann erstirbt die Musik langsam in vereinzelten, dunklen Nachbeben, die das Gefühl der wachsenden Macht der Stille nur noch verstärken.

In Lars von Triers Fassung der Geschichte war auf der Tonspur ebenfalls keine Hoffnung zu spüren. Auch hier verstummte die Musik nach Selmas Tod. Woher hätte die Musik übrigens auch kommen sollen? Der Regisseur (Trier) hatte die Komponistin (Björk) ja gerade gehängt. Nach dieser tragischen Erhängung bewegte sich die Kamera in dem unheimlich theaterhaften Hinrichtungsraum langsam an Selmas baumelnder Leiche hoch zu der darüber liegenden Plattform, wo die empathische Gefängniswärterin als einzige zurückgeblieben war. Sie stand unbeweglich, den Kopf gesenkt, zutiefst berührt von diesem Menschenopfer, an dem sie gerade teilgenommen hatte. Die Kamera fuhr weiter nach oben. Über dem Hinrichtungsraum war nichts mehr, nur ein schwarzes Feld. Der Film endete, als die gesamte Leinwand durch diese kohlrabenschwarze Finsternis ausgefüllt war.

Lars von Triers nach Selmas Tod vorgenommener Kameraschwenk nach oben ähnelt zur Verwechslung dem Aufwärtsschwenk nach dem Tod von Bess in Breaking the Waves - nur bar der triumphierenden Glocken im Himmel. Damit offenbart sich das Ende von Selma Jezková als atheistische Antithese zur katholischen These von Breaking the Waves. Das dialektische Denken, wonach man eine These aufstellt, um sie danach ihrem Gegensatz, der Antithese, gegenüber zu stellen, ist ein erprobtes philosophisches Prinzip, das, wenn man es künstlerisch einzusetzen wagt, den menschlichen Horizont oft erweitert.

Doch Dialektik ist etwas für Fortgeschrittene. Man muss imstande sein, extrem abstrakt zu denken, und zugleich den Mut besitzen, die Leute zu provozieren, die Kunst automatisch als direkten Ausdruck der persönlichen Einstellungen des Künstlers nehmen. Lars von Trier besitzt diese Fähigkeit und diesen Mut und ist sich seiner Methode völlig bewusst: „Ein Großteil meiner Technik besteht darin, irgendeine These aufzustellen, mit der ich nicht einverstanden bin. Ich glaube nicht, dass im Himmel plötzlich Glocken läuten, weil Bess dies oder das tut, ich glaube nicht daran und ich bin nicht damit einverstanden." Trier dürfte auch kaum an die Antithese vom Recht der asketischen Selma auf die ultimative Wirklichkeitsflucht in den Tod glauben. Es handelt sich hier nicht um seine eigene Überzeugung, sondern um eine spätromantische Idee, die er an seinem Publikum erprobt. Er selbst sagt dazu: „Ich versuche etwas zu verteidigen, woran ich nicht glaube. Das ist eine gute Übung, wenn man eine humanistische Überzeugung besitzt."

Es ist auch für uns Zuschauer eine gute Übung. Denn auch wenn wir von Selmas Handlungen im Film intellektuell vielleicht Abstand nehmen, so verstehen wir sie dennoch - vom Gefühl her. Wir können gar nicht anders. Sie ist die Urkraft des gesamten Werkes, alles dreht sich um sie, und früher oder später identifizieren wir uns unweigerlich so sehr mit ihr, dass wir die Welt durch ihr treuherziges, kunstliebendes Inneres erleben. Und hier sind die träumerischen Musicalszenen entscheidend wichtig; denn sie erzählt nicht nur von ihren Träumen, wir erleben sie zusammen mit ihr.

So ist das auch in Ruders' Oper. Von Zeit zu Zeit verlassen wir die schwer zugängliche, nahezu atonale Wirklichkeit, um Selma in die voraussetzungslose, tonale Musikwelt zu folgen, in der alles farbenprächtig schön wird und das Leben sich geborgen und gut anfühlt. Und wir sträuben uns, wenn wir hören, wie sich das auf Realismus beharrende Orchester den Weg in die Träume bahnt, um Selma in die Wirklichkeit zurück zu rufen. In diesen Passagen wirkt Ruders' Musik wie ein aufreizender Wecker, den wir nicht abstellen können. Doch in der Oper gibt es, im Gegensatz zum Film, noch eine zweite Identifikationsfigur, nämlich Selmas Sohn. Er ist nicht wie bei Trier ein seltsamer, mürrischer und introvertierter Junge, der sich nur selten zeigt. Nein, hier ist er von Anfang bis Ende auf der Bühne und versucht, an seine Mutter heranzukommen in dem Bemühen, sie vom Gefühl her zu verstehen. Auf diese Weise fühlen wir Selma innen und außen, und auch die Musik hilft uns mit den Gefühlen.

Genau hier liegt natürlich der deutlichste Unterschied zu Triers Film: In der Oper spielt die Musik, und die Sänger singen die ganze Zeit, auch außerhalb der Musicalnummern. Der hyperrealistische dokumentarhafte Stil, mit dem der Film die Handlung präsentierte, lässt sich also - allein schon aufgrund des Gattungswechsels zur Oper - unmöglich wiederholen. Was nun bedeutet das für unsere Auffassung von Selma?

Im Film wurde Selma von der Popsängerin Björk gespielt. Mehrere Kritiker hoben stark hervor, dass sie Selma nicht spielte, sondern Selma war, was natürlich damit zusammenhing, dass sie keine ausgebildete Schauspielerin ist, aber auch daran lag, dass Björk als Popidol so berühmt ist, dass dieses Image unweigerlich unsere Auffassung von ihr als Selma färben musste. Die Tatsache, dass die eingeschobenen Musicalnummern auch von ihr komponiert waren und von ihr gesungen wurden, verstärkte nur das Gefühl, dass die Künstlerin Björk die Träumerin Selma war.

In der Oper spielt Ylva Kihlberg die alles dominierende Rolle der Selma. Sie hat eine Gesangs- und Schauspielausbildung und ist das, was man als dramatischen Sopran bezeichnet, was heißt, dass sie eine selbst für die Oper ungewöhnlich kräftige, technisch gut fundierte Gesangsstimme ihr eigen nennt, die das im Orchestergraben kräftig hausende 33-Mann-Orchester mit Leichtigkeit übertönen kann. Problemlos schmettert sie an den dramatischsten Stellen der Handlung das hohe „b", doch wie jeder andere Opernsänger riskiert auch sie, dass sie an einem Abend indisponiert oder unkonzentriert ist, sodass die hohen Töne misslingen, sie den Szenenablauf durcheinander bringt oder über eine Bank oder ähnliches stolpert. Von ihrem Hintergrund her kann Ylva Kihlberg sehr viel eher als Björk die Rolle der Selma spielen. Da wir es jedoch mit einer Gattung zu tun haben, die man live erlebt, ist nicht auszuschließen, dass wir sie vereinzelt als diejenige erleben, die sie wirklich ist, nämlich die Sängerin Ylva Kihlberg; in der Oper kann man nicht einfach „Cut!" rufen.

Aber macht nicht genau das die Operngattung so anziehend? Die Präsenz und die Unvorhersehbarkeit? Man weiß nie richtig, was einen erwartet. Dieselbe Inszenierung kann an zwei verschiedenen Tagen ganz unterschiedlich wirken. Das hängt auch von der persönlichen Vergangenheit des Publikums und der Augenblicksstimmung ab. Kurz gesagt: Nach der Premiere haben weder der Librettist noch der Komponist oder der Regisseur das Werk mehr unter Kontrolle, und wenn die Hauptperson eine wirklich schillernde Persönlichkeit wie Selma ist, kann es geschehen, dass wir sie am Montag Abend als überzeugende mythische Heldin erleben, die bereit ist, die Konsequenzen ihrer Fehlhandlungen zu tragen, während sie am Donnerstag darauf eher wie eine moderne, von ihrer Opferrolle besessene Narzisstin wirkt, die sich in dieser Rolle selbst inszeniert hat.

Das sind die Sternstunden der Oper. Man wird nie mit ihr fertig. „Sie sagen, es sei das letzte Lied. Sie kennen uns nicht. Verstehst du, das letzte Lied ist es nur, wenn wir selbst es dazu machen!"

Dr.phil. Nila Parly, Musikwissenschaftlerin

 

 

SELMA JEZKOVÁ - EIN TODESPROZESS IN RÜCKBLENDE

von Esben Tange

 

Die Hauptperson von Selma Jezková ist in gewisser Weise Selmas zwölfjähriger Sohn Gene, obwohl es sich um eine stumme Rolle handelt, abgesehen von dem panischen Ausbruch „Mutter, Mutter!" in der Schlussszene der Oper, als Gene die zum Tode verurteilte Selma mit der Schlinge um den Hals am Galgen stehen sieht.

Gene ist während der gesamten Vorstellung auf der Bühne. Bereits bevor Poul Ruders zwei Todesposaunen die ersten Töne der Oper hat spielen lassen, sieht man Gene als einzigen aktiven Spieler vorn auf der Bühne stehen, angeblich bei Selmas Beerdigung. Und als die Oper vorbei ist, sind wir wieder am Ausgangspunkt. Selma liegt in ihrem Sarg, und der elternlose Gene steht in jeder Beziehung allein da. Die eigentliche Handlung der Oper ist eine einzige lange, von Gene provozierte Rückblende. Seine fragenden Augen hinter den dicken Brillengläsern zwingen die Mutter, die letzten entscheidenden, zu ihrem Tod führenden Szenen, die Gene allein zurücklassen, noch einmal aufzuführen.

Damit hat man in Poul Ruders' und Henrik Engelbrechts Oper Selma Jezková eine grundlegend andere Erzählperspektive als in Lars von Triers Film Dancer in the Dark, in dem die von Björk gespielte Selma den natürlichen Mittelpunkt bildet, während Gene nur ein kleiner verschlossener Junge ist. Eine Reihe konkreter Handlungen ist jedoch identisch, da die Geschichte den gleichen Ausgangspunkt hat. Die Tschechin Selma Jezková ist in die USA gegangen, um Geld für eine teure Operation zu verdienen, die sicherstellen kann, dass ihr Sohn sein Augenlicht behält, das Selmas Mutter und Großvater verloren haben und das auch Selma selbst bald verlieren wird.

Auf eine feierlich schreitende Ouvertüre, bei der Gene seine tote Mutter sozusagen wiedererweckt, folgen die fünf Szenen der Oper, in denen entscheidende Situationen von Selma Jezkovás Leben durchgespielt werden. Der Schauplatz ist eine amerikanische Provinzstadt der 1950er Jahre. Zwischendurch bringt Selma einige ihrer inneren Vorstellungen in einer Reihe von Liedern, „Selmas Liedern", zum Ausdruck.

 

Szene 1: Die Fabrik

Selma arbeitet in einer Metallwarenfabrik am Fließband. Die Arbeit erfordert Konzentration, trotzdem versucht sich die sehschwache Selma aus der eintönigen Arbeit und dem Fabriklärm fort zu träumen, indem sie Musicallieder einzuüben probiert, die sie während der Arbeit mit großer Anstrengung aus einem Manuskript entziffert.

 

Hear the magic of a crash

Hear the music of the noise

Hear my dreams and aspirations

All in one metallic voice

 

I go back through all dimensions

I am laughing - I can see.

I am feeling like a dancer,

Kathy, come and dance with me.

 

See the splendor and the grandeur,

Feel the fading of the pain.

See the world around us changing,

Feel the dream come true again.

 

I go back through all dimensions,

I am flying fast and free.

I am feeling like a dancer,

I am laughing - I can see.

 

Um möglichst viel Geld zu verdienen, arbeitet Selma auch in der Nachtschicht. Die Freundin und Kollegin Kathy warnt sie, dass sie wegen Übermüdung Gefahr läuft, sich bei der gefährlichen Fließbandarbeit zu verletzen. Selma hat schon einmal Werkzeug der Fabrik unbrauchbar gemacht, und als es nun wieder schief geht, wird sie vom Vorarbeiter Norman gefeuert, der ihr in einem Umschlag den letzten Lohn aushändigt.

 

Szene 2: Der Wohnwagen

Wir befinden uns in dem Wohnwagen, in dem Selma und Gene in sehr primitiven Verhältnissen leben. Selma steckt ihren letzten Lohn in eine mit Geldscheinen vollgestopfte Büchse. Einen kurzen Augenblick lang denkt sie an die Vorstellungen zurück, die sie sich in Prag von einem wundervollen Leben in Amerika gemacht hat.

Selma wohnt zur Miete bei dem Ortspolizisten Bill, der zu Besuch kommt. Bill erzählt Selma von seiner unglücklichen Ehe mit Linda, die drauf und dran ist, ihn zu ruinieren, da sie unter Kaufzwang leidet. Selma erzählt Bill dafür von der Krankheit, die sie bald blind machen wird. Sie vertraut ihm auch an, dass sie gelogen und allen gesagt hat, sie habe das Geld verdient, um ihrem Vater Oldrich Novy in Tschechien zu helfen. Das ist reine Erfindung, Selma hat keinen Vater, Oldrich Novy ist der Name eines Musicalschauspielers, den Selma in ihrer Jugend erlebt hat. Der falsche Vater ist nur ein Alibi für Selma, die so all ihr Geld für Genes Operation hat sparen können. Der Junge weiß aber nicht, wie ernst seine Augenkrankheit ist.

Bill erblickt Selmas Geldbüchse und bittet sie um einen Kredit, weil er hofft, damit durch neue Käufe seine gescheiterte Ehe mit Linda retten zu können. Doch Selma widersetzt sich, da sie das ganze Geld für den Arzt braucht, der jetzt Gene operieren soll. In äußerster Verzweiflung erwägt Bill einen Selbstmord mit seiner Dienstpistole, bedroht aber stattdessen Selma und versucht ihr die Geldbüchse zu entreißen, sie wehrt sich jedoch nach Kräften, die Pistole geht los, der Schuss trifft Bill selbst. Er ist allerdings nicht tödlich, weshalb der seelisch gebrochene Bill Selma anfleht, ihn umzubringen.

 

Szene 3: Der Gerichtssaal

Den Prozess, bei dem Selma des Mordes an Bill angeklagt wird, leitet der Staatsanwalt, der in hysterischen Wendungen Selma als gieriges, zynisches Frauenzimmer hinstellt, das Bill kaltblütig ermordet habe, und als Selma erklärt, Bill habe sie gebeten, ihn umzubringen, macht er sie lächerlich. Von den Zuschauern im Gerichtssaal unbemerkt hat Selma dafür gesorgt, dass Gene das Geld aus der Büchse bekommen hat. Als Selma unter Druck des Staatsanwalts erklärt, Bill habe ihre Ersparnisse stehlen wollen, sagt sie auch, sie habe das Geld jetzt an ihren Vater Oldrich Novy nach Prag geschickt. Da der Staatsanwalt daraufhin triumphierend den alternden Musicalschauspieler in den Zeugenstand holen kann, ist für Selma alles verloren. Oldrich Novy lebt mittlerweile in Kalifornien und kennt Selma überhaupt nicht.

In dem verzweifelten Versuch, das Leben seiner Mutter zu retten und selbst in die Handlung des Stückes einzutreten, versucht Gene, die Büchse mit dem Geld an die Leute im Gerichtssaal loszuwerden, doch niemand hat einen Blick für den zwölfjährigen Jungen, der die ganze Vorstellung als blinder Passagier mitspielt. Selma Jezková wird zum Tod durch den Strang verurteilt.

 

Szene 4: Die Todeszelle

Allein in der Todeszelle, versucht Selma von ihrem Leben und ihren Vorstellungen vom Himmelreich zu erzählen.

 

My life was not a story,

Like those I used to know.

Where nothing bad could happen,

And happiness would flow.

 

I gave you all I had, dear Gene,

I tried so hard I could.

A castle in the air, perhaps.

I know you understood.

 

My life is nearly over now,

And very soon I'll see,

The things that now are hidden,

The place I long to be.

 

Where all is made of music,

Where all is sounds of joy,

Where dancers spin and turn and twirl,

I'll wait there for my boy.

 

Kathy besucht Selma im Gefängnis, wo sie ihr sagt, dass sie Selmas Betrug mit dem falschen Vater durchschaut habe und dass Gene seine Mutter besuchen möchte. Doch Selma lehnt es ab, Gene zu sehen. Er soll sie vergessen und in seine eigene Zukunft schauen, an der sie nicht mehr teilhaben kann. Kathy fragt sie verwundert, weshalb Selma ein Kind gewollt habe, wenn sie doch gewusst habe, dass es die gleiche Krankheit bekommen würde wie sie.

 

I knew.

I could not help it.

I wanted it so bad.

 

I wanted to hold a little baby.

Just hold him,

In my arms

 

Kathy fordert Selma auf, die Wahrheit über das Geld für Genes Operation zu sagen und das Geld für einen Rechtsanwalt zu nehmen. Das kann Selmas Leben retten und sicherstellen, dass Gene seine Mutter behält. Doch Selma beharrt darauf, dass Genes Augenoperation wichtiger sei. Selma bleibt nicht mehr viel Zeit. Die Gefängniswärterin Brenda versucht der von Angst geschüttelten Selma Mut zu machen, um ihres Sohnes willen die Hinrichtung durchzustehen.

 

Szene 5: Der Galgenraum

Selma steht auf der Falltür des Galgens. Es kommt zu einer Panikszene, weil Selma unter der obligatorischen Kapuze keine Luft bekommt. Mit Brendas Hilfe gelingt es, ihr die Kapuze zu ersparen. Zugleich erzwingt sich Kathy Zugang zum Galgen und gibt Selma Genes Brille als Zeichen dafür, dass er operiert worden ist und sein Augenlicht nicht verlieren wird. Jetzt macht sich Selma bereit zu sterben.

 

I listen to my heart,

I feel you very near.

Oh Gene I'm not alone,

I know that you are here.

 

You and me.

They tell you that it's over now,

But we will prove them wrong.

Yes, we can see through that my dear.

 

It's only the next to last song.

Playing for you,

Playing for me.

It's only the next to last song.


Nach der Hinrichtung verlassen alle den Raum. Gene kann jetzt seine tote Mutter in den Sarg zurücklegen, ihr die Brille abnehmen und ihr einen letzten Kuss geben.

 

Esben Tange ist Musik- und Medienwissenschaftler, Redakteur von Programm 2 des Dänischen Rundfunks und künstlerischer Leiter des Rued-Langgaard-Festivals.

Selma on the blog
19 August 2011
When Poul Ruders' opera "Selma Jezková" conquered New York's Lincoln Center in July, the tragic plot made a strong impression on the American audience.New video: Selma Jezková trailer
31 May 2011
Poul Ruders introduces his opera "Selma Jezková" (Dancer in the Dark) in this video trailer for Dacapo Records' new DVD release

Be the first to write a recommendation.


Please sign in or register to write a recommendation.

Recorded live at the Royal Danish Opera on 13 September 2010

Stage director: Kasper Holten
Set designer: Christian Lemmerz
Costume designer: Maria Gyllenhoff
Lighting designer: Jesper Kongshaug
Choreography: Signe Fabricius

A co-production with Norrlandsoperan, Umeå

 

DVD production

Director: Uffe Borgwardt
Executive producer: Peter Borgwardt
Assistant producer: Julie Borgwardt-Stampe
Camera operators: Henrik Herbert, Henrik Nielsen, Krister Stub Jørgensen, Kim Frandsen,
Uffe Borgwardt and Niels Buchholzer
Technical coordinator: Jesper Nørgård
CCU: Johnny Mogensen
Colour grading: Christian Skriver
Production manager: Stine Abell
Editors: Uffe Borgwardt and Peter Borgwardt
Sound recording by the Danish Broadcasting Corporation
Recording producer: Henrik Sleiborg
Sound engineer: Peter Bo Nielsen
Editing sound engineer: Lars Christensen
Subtitles: Dansk Video Tekst

"From the cradle to the gallows" has been produced by Uffe Borgwardt for the Danish Broadcasting Coorporation

Photos on cover, back cover and DVD menus: Miklos Szabo
Publisher: Edition Wilhelm Hansen AS, www.ewh.dk
This production has been made possible by the generous support of Oticon Fonden, Augustinus Fonden, Solistforeningen af 1921, Danish Composers' Society/KODA's Fund for Social and Cultural Purposes, and Dansk Kapelmester Forenin

 

Label: Dacapo

Format: DVD (NTSC)

Catalogue Number: 2.110410

Barcode: 747313541058

Release Date: May 2011

Period: 21st Century

Promotional videos

Reviews

Opera
"...an outstanding record of a quite extraordinary work. I can't recommend it too highly"
Read more >>
Klassisk
4/5 Stars
"Det cirkulære handlingsforløb og den enkle scenografi virker stærkt og klart på skærmen"
Read more >>
Classica
3/5 Stars
"Équipe de la creation danoise parfaite"
Read more >>
TimeOut Chicago Review
4/5 Stars
"Lead Ylva Kihlberg’s unwavering soprano stands as the vocal highlight of the performance"
Read more >>
International Record Review
"The whole production is a triumph of dramatic focus and concentration ... If a UK staging of Selma Jezková is not already scheduled, it certainly ought to be."
Read more >>
David's Review Corner
"One act operas have been singularly unsuccessful in the history of opera, but this compelling story may prove the exception".
Read more >>


A CC Music Store Solution